The Rise of Microzon?

79 percent of all smartphones shipped in the second quarter of 2013 are powered by Android. That’s an obscene share of the global market by any standard and a reality made possible through the use of their open source software as well as the more tightly controlled “Google Approved” versions it provides along with Google …   Read More

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The Rise of Microzon79 percent of all smartphones shipped in the second quarter of 2013 are powered by Android.

That’s an obscene share of the global market by any standard and a reality made possible through the use of their open source software as well as the more tightly controlled “Google Approved” versions it provides along with Google Play and a plethora of branded software applications.

Recently, stories have surfaced that Amazon may offer a completely free smartphone and take the smartphone battle to another level. But what if Amazon actually went a step further?

Now, I expect this is going to sound impossible to many, however, just consider for a moment what would happen if Amazon partnered with Microsoft to bring the Microzon smartphone to market.

Okay, maybe the Amasoft smartphone?

Microsoft just acquired Nokia and is floundering with single digit market share despite having a solid mobile OS.  Within the non-premium phone market, their OS would be considered by many as a step up from the most recent Android flavors.

Microsoft built their business on software and partnerships with manufacturers and complimentary service companies.  This stands in stark contrast to Apple’s model and very similar to how Google evolved.

With the exception of Xbox, Microsoft’s independent manufacturing efforts have largely failed to date. Even Microsoft’s app store content is miniscule compared to Google and Android. Like BlackBerry, its market share is so underwhelming that new apps aren’t even being launched for its OS.

Simply put, Microsoft needs unit sales and share to become relevant.  That’s exactly what Amazon can provide here.

Here’s the breakdown.

Amazon brings retail, a stronger app store experience, cash (to make the free model work), books, music, a strong delivery channel, and a history of taking share from both Google and Apple in the tablet market.

Microsoft brings Nokia and a 41 Mega pixel camera to the party, a better OS for tablets than open source Android, a gaming platform that can integrate into the phone to play Xbox games, better interaction with Office products and a cross channel ad platform that can help them eat into Google’s leading mobile ad revenue business.  Microsoft also has Skype which can power a superior and better integrated experience than Amazon could produce on its own.

Clearly, both Amazon and Microsoft could choose this strategy independently and fragment the market even further.  However, they have very complimentary value propositions with less overlap than most would think.  With Ballmer departing and Microsoft 3.0 on the horizon, I could see this happening and generating the kind of buzz that is needed to truly compete with Android and iOS.

What do you think?  Fantasy or plausible?

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3 comments

  1. Joan_BlogBizBuzz

    Thanks for an interesting article Joseph, somehow they missing out  a big bite of the pie, perhaps Microsoft should stop charging for everything that is launched, in giving you receive. The marketing arena has changed from push marketing to attracting people to want more.
    Having Amazon, Skype and Nokia mix they should be streaks ahead. Being online most days of the week I have noted that most want to partake in what they are able to capture/design and share.
    For example the Nokia phone has one of the best camera’s on board, what about linking to Instagram quick and easy, user friendly. Folk want instant gratification in sharing. With Skype connection the mix,  ready to connect with others on the move with mobile conferencing. Amazon shopping connection,  in more ways than one.
    Complimentary software that is user friendly will go a far way, especially with mobile in mind.

  2. Joseph Shavit

    I
    will agree that Microsoft makes some nice keyboards and mice.  Then
    again, so do many of the 36 manufacturers listed on Wikipedia (). 
    When Ballmer leaves Microsoft, he won’t be sharing with his peers that
    he and Bill were great because they built nice and cost effective mice
    and keyboards.  If that’s what Microsoft is now about, then they’ve already lost.

  3. MediaCastleX

    It’s funny, the things no body ever mentions when they talk about Microsoft hardware…despite listing what they THINK are the only things they made (Surface, Xbox and now windows phones) are the MOUSE and KEYBOARD. They actually make those themselves! Oh, what? Not as edgy as talking about the Zune which no one but myself and a small number of thousands purchased?! So a statement such as, “Microsoft’s independent manufacturing efforts have failed miserably to date” is essentially FALSE. U_U

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