Staples: Telecommuting Means Happier, Healthier Employees

Not everyone is following Yahoo and Best Buy down the path of killing telecommuting as we presently know it. A new Staples Advantage survey spearheaded by the world’s largest office products company is providing “evidence” as to why Yahoo and Best Buy might be making a bad move. Telecommuting programs make for happier employers and …   Read More

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Not everyone is following Yahoo and Best Buy down the path of killing telecommuting as we presently know it.

A new Staples Advantage survey spearheaded by the world’s largest office products company is providing “evidence” as to why Yahoo and Best Buy might be making a bad move.

Telecommuting programs make for happier employers and employees, reducing absenteeism and stress, according to the second annual telecommuting survey issued by Staples Advantage, the business-to-business division of Staples, Inc.

Nearly all (93 percent) surveyed employees agree that telecommuting programs are mutually beneficial, and more than half (53 percent) of business decision makers state telecommuting leads to more productive employees.

Despite the anti-telecommuting posturing by some, the number of regular telecommuters in the U.S. is expected to reach 4.9 million by 2016 – a 69 percent increase from the current level.

“Telecommuting can help achieve balance between workplace demands and life obligations, but being successful isn’t as simple as just sending employees home with their laptops,” says Tom Heisroth, senior vice president for Staples Advantage. “At Staples, we make it easy for businesses to set up telecommuting programs with everything employees need to be productive, including furniture, technology and office products.”

Do you agree with the study’s conclusions?

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