Report: U.S. Healthcare Industry To Spend $4.5 Billion On Wireless Data By 2014

According to data released in a recent report by In-Stat, the healthcare industry in the U.S. will spend more than $4.5B on wireless data by 2014. The research points to several mHealth use-cases as drivers, including caregivers’ interest in access to patient data, coordinating care; validating patient identity; billing for services and preventing medical errors. …   Read More

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According to data released in a recent report by In-Stat, the healthcare industry in the U.S. will spend more than $4.5B on wireless data by 2014.

The research points to several mHealth use-cases as drivers, including caregivers’ interest in access to patient data, coordinating care; validating patient identity; billing for services and preventing medical errors.  “Immediacy and mobility are primary objectives in healthcare, In-Stat explained in its press release.  “Medical caregivers seek portable access to data, patients’ status, records, diagnostic tools, prescriptions, and medications.”

We’re hitting a critical point in mobile healthcare (mHealth) innovation where we’re starting to see a strong shift away from basic smartphone apps and basic consumer-focused applications, to more advanced clinician and provider-focused applications that rely heavily on wireless data.  Beyond just healthcare, US enterprises in general are continuing in their adoption of wireless solutions to business problems.

According to In-Stat, mobile 24/7 business imperatives continue to drive enterprises to meet focused demands for wireless voice and data.  Real-time or near-real-time information for emergency alerts, financial market feeds, accurate price changes, or supply chain snafus preoccupies commercial users and provides a return-on-investment for wireless spending.

“Growing federal initiatives have increased the emphasis on digitizing records nationwide,” says Greg Potter, Research Analyst. “At the same time, disaster response and disease control increasingly require integration with governmental authorities. Add in an aging population, complex insurance company billing, patient identity protection, and drug theft and you have the perfect storm in the pursuit of a digital means to rein in personnel and asset management costs with a highly mobile medical workforce.”

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