QR Codes Put To Use For Gulf Relief, Helps Petition Gain 117,000 Signatures To Date

QR codes are slowly making themselves known in mainstream applications, with a prime example being its use in a massive campaign centered around Gulf relief. Activist group Women of the Storm is rallying public support around Gulf restoration through its celebrity-backed Be the One campaign...

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QR codes are slowly making themselves known in mainstream applications, with a prime example being its use in a massive campaign centered around Gulf relief.

Activist group Women of the Storm is rallying public support around Gulf restoration through its celebrity-backed Be the One campaign to get signatures for their petition, which states: “I demand that a plan to restore America’s Gulf be fully funded and implemented for me and future generations.”  The primary call-to-action they chose to use is what’s interesting.

Mobile barcode company ScanLife created a QR code that, when scanned, directs users to a mobile site where they can watch the Be the One video and sign the petition.  To boost awareness, the QR codes have been placed on t-shirts as well as on the Thomas Reuters billboard in Time Square.  So far, the campaign has proved very successful, garnering more than 117,000 signatures with the help of the QR code call-to-action.

Campaigns like this not only boost awareness for the mobile barcode concept in general, but also proves how successful they can be when implemented properly.  In this case, they can also prove to be an effective tool for social activism.

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2 comments

  1. Pete

    Be interesting to see exactly how many scans of the code there were.

    The implication is that QR drives 120k signatures but it's a bit disingenous to suggest that

  2. jeparsons

    This is a very well implemented mobile campaign. Kudos on design, placement and (above all) an engaging mobile experience with a measurable action item.

    However, those who are all excited about this (particularly those spreading the word on Facebook) should be aware that America's Wetland Foundation and Women of the Storm are funded by large oil companies — including BP — whose aim is to induce taxpayers to fund more of the cleanup.
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/brendan-demelle/wet

    Like all media, mobile campaigns are amoral; they're just tools. It's how people use them that counts.

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