New Study Suggests Advertisers May Want to Tune Out AM/FM Radio and Target Streaming Platforms Like Pandora

Radio advertising is far from dead. But it certainly has evolved. Without question, reaching consumers while they listen to music still presents invaluable opportunities for advertisers. But for the best chance of being heard and truly engaging with listeners, it may be time to tune off the AM/FM stations and make the switch to streaming …   Read More

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commutercodeRadio advertising is far from dead. But it certainly has evolved.

Without question, reaching consumers while they listen to music still presents invaluable opportunities for advertisers. But for the best chance of being heard and truly engaging with listeners, it may be time to tune off the AM/FM stations and make the switch to streaming platforms.

Why?

According to eye- and ear-opening new insight from Edison Research‘s latest study, traditional radio has complicated and confounded the practice of radio advertising.

Based on the data at hand, 70% of drivers don’t listen to the full commercial break when listening to AM / FM radio.  But it’s not just the ads that are causing them to switch—it’s equally due to repetitive, un-personalized playlists, a report summary shared with MMW reads.

The news largely corroborates a host of previous reports and suggestions indicating that streaming radio — which has a much more engaged audience — is the future of in-car radio advertising.

“Personalized audio in a low-clutter environment simply results in more driver attention,” says the team at Pandora, which continues to impress advertisers with an ability to connect and engage with listeners in a way that traditional radio no longer can.

Fittingly, Pandora just released a new whitepaper — The State of In-Car Audio  — which delves deeper into some of the findings by Edison Research and makes a compelling case for why advertisers may want to shift to a stream-first mentality.

To learn more or to check out the whitepaper, click here.

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