New comScore Data Reveals Mobile Device, Social Media Preferences Between Young and Old

New data procured from comScore research reveals that there are differences – big differences – not only between how young and old people engage with mobile devices, but also how they use said devices to connect to social media. “In May 2015,” the research behemoth explains, “almost 90% of the U.S. digital media population visited …   Read More

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New comScore Data Reveals Mobile Device Preference Differences Between Young and OldNew data procured from comScore research reveals that there are differences – big differences – not only between how young and old people engage with mobile devices, but also how they use said devices to connect to social media.

“In May 2015,” the research behemoth explains, “almost 90% of the U.S. digital media population visited social networks, which accounted for more than 300 billion minutes of users’ attention. As social networking penetration inches ever closer to reaching the total internet population, differences in how people engage with social networks become more apparent.”

The comScore Mobile Metrix data further reveals that “preferences between tablets and smartphones for social media usage vary depending on the age of the user.”

How does it all shake out?

“The average 18 to 44 year-old smartphone social networking user spends in excess of 25 hours per month consuming social content on that device, while the numbers are considerably lower for those age 45+,” according to comScore. “However the reverse is true on their larger screen mobile counterparts, as tablet social networkers age 35+ spend more than 17 hours per month on those devices, while 18-34 year-olds spend far less on average.”

So what’s behind the differences?

“A possible explanation for these differences is that the older digital consumers haven’t proved to be as “addicted” to their smartphones as Millennials certainly are,” the company adds. “While many Millennials view their smartphones as their digital lifeline – in other words, their primary and most personal access point to the internet’s unlimited supply of information and communication channels – older generations seem to prefer the ‘sit-back’, larger screen experience that more closely resembles the days of reading a newspaper, a book, or even using a laptop computer.”

In the end, one truth is undeniably evident. Social media platforms are seeing unprecedented mobile engagement growth (at least to the tune of 25 percent year-over-year) in each and every age group.

To learn more, check out the comScore report here.

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