Mobile Needs to Be Considered a Strategy, Not a Campaign

Most marketers see mobile advertising as a campaign, not as its own strategy. According to a study conducted by the Chief Marketing Officer Council, only a scant 17% of respondents reported that their mobile efforts lined up with their entire marketing strategies. According to Laurie Sullivan of MediaPost, who was privy to the report’s findings, …   Read More

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Mobile Needs to Be Considered a Strategy, Not a CampaignMost marketers see mobile advertising as a campaign, not as its own strategy. According to a study conducted by the Chief Marketing Officer Council, only a scant 17% of respondents reported that their mobile efforts lined up with their entire marketing strategies.

According to Laurie Sullivan of MediaPost, who was privy to the report’s findings, nearly a third of respondents said that they have no mobile strategy at all or that they do not view mobile as a strategy. Most classify it as a campaign and because it does not necessarily align very well with the overall strategy, it is often an afterthought.

This is concerning, especially when you consider how quickly mobile use is growing. Numerous studies have shown that it is one of the channels with the highest engagement numbers and is great for interacting with and retaining customers. Even with this information, most marketers have not yet found a place for mobile marketing in their larger marketing strategy.

While mobile phones are becoming central to the lives on consumers, they are not becoming central to the lives of marketers, which is a serious problem. Mobile commerce already comprises 12% of consumer media attention and 15% of revenues, with those percentages only predicted to continue growing along with smartphone use and confidence in smartphone safety.

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2 comments

  1. indigo102

    In 2010, online traffic from mobile was 3%, it’s now 52%. A staggering 1,600% increase in just four years. Google announced back in 2012 that it was a mobile first business. Very few businesses have followed that lead most still think with a desktop mentality. 

    This is concerning when you consider the potential impact. Almost two thirds of people start researching products and services on mobile and over 50% say that they are less likely to engage with a company that has a bad mobile experience. It is so important to deliver a great first impression. Google firmly state: “A good user experience is critical, yet many brands neglect it and lose customers”. Bounce rates are typically over 70% for a non optimised or poor mobile site. Think about the last time you visited a really bad mobile website – did you engage with the organisation or leave frustrated? Too many organisations are simply not placing enough focus on mobile.

    Mobile is fundamentally different. You would not put a radio Ad on TV and expect it to deliver value. Similarly you should not put a desktop web experience in front of a mobile user and expect it to work. It won’t.

    That is exactly what so many organisations are doing, building responsive web sites with a desktop mentality. Services are alienating their customers.

    Go to a mobile expert …
    A few years ago you would not have considered started your website development without using someone that had experience of creating websites, today you should really seek the advice of a mobile specialist if you don’t want to alienate your customers.

  2. NikitaSingh

    For proper strategy and mobile marketing service connect with Mocolive India.
    http://www.mocolive.com

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