Mobile Marketing Association Issues Non-Response To T-Mobile SMS Price Hike

The Mobile Marketing Association (MMA) has received several inquiries asking for its stance on the situation surrounding T-Mobile’s SMS price increase and its implications, and has finally issued a response….sort of. When asked for comment, the MMA keeps things short and sweet, saying;  “The MMA is not going to comment or take a position on …   Read More

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The Mobile Marketing Association (MMA) has received several inquiries asking for its stance on the situation surrounding T-Mobile’s SMS price increase and its implications, and has finally issued a response….sort of.

When asked for comment, the MMA keeps things short and sweet, saying;  “The MMA is not going to comment or take a position on this, or any, rumor.  We do not have the full context or facts in this case, and it is our understanding that the rumors began when information was taken out of context from discussions between T-Mobile and its business partners and was then reported in an online news story.”

Contradicting this stance, we just reported that T-Mobile has begun to respond to the issue, saying the move “affects only the messaging aggregators that serve as a kind of middleman between businesses and carriers.”  While this doesn’t affect big-players with direct connections to the carriers — such as Twitter and Facebook — it still has far-reaching implications to the rest of the many mobile content and service providers who don’t maintain such direct connections.  Companies in this category are forced to go through so-called “middlemen” (aggregators) to get their messages sent, and will still very much be affected by the changes.

Still, the MMA maintains its standard non-position on the matter, saying “It is MMA’s policy to respect the commercial integrity of its members and to not comment or entertain any discussion surrounding the business relationships between its members and their business partners.”

This is very surprising to me that the MMA, an organization with the sole purpose of “creating a sustainable mobile marketing industry,” is remaining silent on such an important issue.  This is why organizations like the Mobile Internet Content Coalition (MICC) were created to fight for the rights of mobile service providers, mobile marketers and consumers alike on issues directly related to the industry.  The MICC is very active in its cause, and the MMA should stand up as well.

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