Mobile Healthcare (mHealth) News Roundup

How will mHealth business models evolve 2010-2015? The first generation of mHealth solutions in the new smartphone applications market have adopted a narrow range of business models, concentrating on revenues generated from application download sales, and subscriptions for content access over a period of time; average of 4-8 USD per download depending on the app …   Read More

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How will mHealth business models evolve 2010-2015?

The first generation of mHealth solutions in the new smartphone applications market have adopted a narrow range of business models, concentrating on revenues generated from application download sales, and subscriptions for content access over a period of time; average of 4-8 USD per download depending on the app store. In a very few cases publishers have linked the application to a device/sensor or service, such as the WiThing Scales Sync which provides a free application for use with a scale which is sold through the publisher’s website.

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Pharma investments in apps, Web rise 78 percent

According to a recent report from Ernst & Young, pharmaceutical companies led by Merck and Novartis have increased their investments in mobile phone apps and educational websites by 78 percent. The apps and sites generally aim to encourage patients to take their medications, eat well and exercise more often, according to the report. Pharma companies launched a total of 97 projects that made use of information technologies to improve patient health last year. E&Y mined press releases and analyst reports to tally the number of launches. Those 97 projects amount to an impressive figure, especially since pharma launched 127 such projects in during the previous four years combined.

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Smartphones Making Mobile Healthcare More Sophisticated

In late 2010, John Moore of the Chilmark Research blog heralded mobile technology as a looming “disruptive” force in modern healthcare. “And with disruption, opportunity blooms,” Moore added.  So much opportunity is now on the horizon in 2011 that Chilmark estimates that the enterprise m-health market will top $1.7 billion within three years.  Pushing the rapid growth of the m-health industry is the breakneck pace of global smartphone adoption and tablet computers, which is simultaneously cultivating the enterprise usage of mobile applications.

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Africa likely to lead in mobile health arena

Lack of existing health-care systems and underdeveloped privacy laws are likely to push faster adoption of mobile health business models in Africa compared to developed countries.  Operators and partners from developed countries are projecting that it will take at least five years before they can navigate through laws and develop appropriate business models, but in Africa, m-health projects are taking off.  Big companies and organizations such as Accenture, Qualcomm, Orange, MTN and the UN Foundation mHealth Alliance have been involved in pilot projects in India and Africa but are yet to come up with models that will work in the West.

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Health Care IT: Mobile Apps Show Promise for Medication Adherence

The study “Medication Adherence and mHealth” by George Washington University proved that using mobile technology can be a helpful tool for patients who often struggle to keep track of their medication schedules. A conference at GWU on Feb. 9 reviewed the survey’s results, which showed high acceptance and sustained use of the Vocel Pill Phone app. The app ran on a handset connected to Cricket’s 3G EvDO network and incorporating Qualcomm chipsets. The tool allows caregivers to program reminders for dosages using a secure Web application and compile an online dosage diary. Simplicity is key for the Pill Phone app, especially when hypertension patients need to take more than eight pills per day, according to Tom Evangelisti, president of wireless health for the software’s developer, Vocel. “8.1 medications … That’s just mind-boggling,”

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