Mobile Healthcare (mHealth) News Roundup

Home Health Monitoring Was A $10 Billion Market In 2010 The worldwide market for home health monitoring of “welfare diseases” was worth about € 7.6 billion ($10 billion) in 2010, according to Berg Insight.  The conditions most commonly treated via these remote monitoring services include diabetes, cardiac arrhythmia, sleep apnea, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease …   Read More

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Home Health Monitoring Was A $10 Billion Market In 2010

The worldwide market for home health monitoring of “welfare diseases” was worth about € 7.6 billion ($10 billion) in 2010, according to Berg Insight.  The conditions most commonly treated via these remote monitoring services include diabetes, cardiac arrhythmia, sleep apnea, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the report found.  More than 200 million people in the EU and the US suffer from one or more chronic conditions where remote monitoring would be helpful.

Dell Acquires InSite One, Boosts Offerings For Healthcare Industry

Dell has acquired InSite One, a cloud-based medical archiving company.  The company said it plans to integrate InSite One’s software and storage services with Dell’s existing Unified Clinical Archive offering.  Because the technology is cloud-based and vendor neutral, medical professionals will be able to access and share images regardless of the technology used on either end.

Health IT Forecast: Balancing Techno-Optimism With Local Realities

Jane Sarasohn-Kahn of iHealthBeat has issued her annual health IT forecast for the new year.  The bottom line, she says, is “more money will be spent on health IT  in 2011 than at any time in U.S. history. The signing of the 2009 federal economic stimulus package, which included the HITECH Act, attracted new entrants into the health IT market. We will continue to see a flow of health IT developers challenging long-standing players in the market on several fronts: for traditional applications, built on open source standards; for applications traveling over new platforms, such as mobile (phone and tablet) and cloud computing; and for innovative apps that pioneering providers and consumers will try out as early adopters.”

CSC Says Wireless Technologies, Robots Will Transform mHealth

Mobile and wireless technologies dominate a Computer Sciences Corp. list of six technologies that show promise for improving patient care and making a better working environment for clinicians, particularly nurses.  The six technologies include workflow management systems, real-time location systems (RTLS), wireless mobile VoIP communication, wireless patient monitoring, delivery robots and interactive patient systems.

PricewaterhouseCoopers Outlines Key 2011 Healthcare Reform Issues

New rules and payment models will force health organizations to undergo a strategy makeover in 2011, according to Top Health Industry Issues of 2011 that was published recently by PricewaterhouseCoopers PwC’s Health Research Institute.  Among the the issues, PwC forecasts that record spending on health information technology next year will increase demand for skilled HIT professionals, while payment models will shift from fee-for-service to new models that focus on performance, health outcomes and shared cost savings.  In addition, significant changes in benefit plan design, plan pricing and the health plan landscape can be expected.

HP Powers SMS-Enabled Pill Authentication

HP has inked a deal with mPedigree, which offers a text message based service that helps users check the authenticity of their medications. The technology has been piloted in Ghana and Nigeria. With hosting and security provided by HP, mPedigree will offer the service to patients taking a range of medications manufactured by May & Baker Nigeria and KAMA Group of Ghana. Users can send a free text message to get an instant response as to whether the tablets or syrup bottles are genuine.

Report: 70% Want Access To mHealth

Worldwide about 70 percent of people are interested in having access to at least one mHealth application, according to a new research report from Pyramid Research. What’s more they are willing to pay for that access, the report found. Pyramid also estimates that about 200 million mHealth applications are in use today and that number will triple by 2012.

FDA Approves Zephyr’s Remote Patient Monitoring

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced last week that it had granted Zephyr Technology 510(k) clearance for its remote patient monitor system.  Zephyr describes its system as a real-time physiological and biomechanical monitoring system, which it has deployed in training and high stress operational environments. The company’s “Bio Harness” tracks critical vital signs (ECG, heart rate, breathing rate, skin temperature ) and “contextualizes the information” by mashing it up with the individual’s activity level and posture via an accelerometer. Zephyr has ongoing collaborations with fire departments, NASA Ames Research Center, National Guard Civil Support Teams and multiple US Special Forces.

Philips To Push Into Wireless In-Hospital Monitoring

Royal Philips Electronics’ medical arm is planning a push into wireless monitoring of patients in hospital wards, according to a report from the Associated Press.  According to a recent report, wirelessly enabled in-hospital patient monitors will grow at a modest but steady annual growth rate of 13 percent between now and 2014. Hospitals that currently own wireless monitors will be the ones spending the most on them during the period.  Philips medical chief Steve Rusckowski told the AP that the company will soon introduce a system of sensors that transmit information wirelessly from the patient to a nearby monitor that could alert nurses if vital signs worsen. According to the AP report, about 40 percent of hospital beds currently use monitors and those are not in general wards — mostly surgery or intensive care settings.

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