Mobile Barcode Survey: 97 Percent Of Consumers Find Them Useful, iPhone Favored

We’ve already covered the extensive use of mobile barcodes this holiday shopping season, and a new survey from Scanbuy acts as more proof of its growing usage. The barcode provider conducted a poll on Twitter and Facebook to learn how consumers are utilizing mobile barcodes while shopping over the holidays.  More than half of respondents …   Read More

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We’ve already covered the extensive use of mobile barcodes this holiday shopping season, and a new survey from Scanbuy acts as more proof of its growing usage.

The barcode provider conducted a poll on Twitter and Facebook to learn how consumers are utilizing mobile barcodes while shopping over the holidays.  More than half of respondents (57%) said they’ve scanned at least one mobile barcode, while 40% said they’ve scanned a barcode five or more times.  On the other side, another 40% said they’ve never scanned a mobile barcode, but “would like to.”

The poll also found that 90% of consumers find mobile barcodes “useful in some capacity,” with only 3% finding them “not very useful.”  Not surprisingly, over 60% stated they are most likely to scan barcodes from product packaging — which is the primary use for mobile barcodes presently.  Also not surprising, price comparison was the most popular feature for consumers while shopping, with user reviews and product offers also getting strong interest.

Other findings include more than half of consumers saying they’d most likely scan a barcode to look up prices Online, but some also like getting information without finding a sales clerk.  Finally, the iPhone was the device most used by respondents, with 34% of those surveyed saying it was the device they used most.  BlackBerry and Android were right behind at 29% and 27% respectively.

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5 comments

  1. Eddy

    Exactly… don't know why these PR companies bother. All it says is "there are no proper independant stats on barcode reading (that don't say few people use them, so we'll (rather obviously) stick some crap out in the hope that some blogs will post it without any comment.

    So – in this case – win for Scanlife as MMW has published it.

  2. Giff Gfroerer, i2SMS

    Yes, indeed mobile barcodes are on the upswing and have a great figure… Interesting, but once again, who paid for this survey? Always ask yourself "who paid for the survey" before you fall hook, line and sinker for the results. In this case, ScanBuy paid for the survey. Don't you reckon the company they hired to do the survey had a financial interest in coming back with deceiving figures?

    So, to test these statistics I did a quick survey of friends and acquaintances. I asked 14 people knowledgeable within the mobile industry, (granted, not a large sample), if they had ever scanned a barcode with their mobile device. All 14 people, 100%, responded NO. I asked if they would have an interest in scanning a barcode with their mobile device. 12 people asked me what I was talking about, two people said possibly, but why. Once the concept was explained, they all seemed to think it was a good idea, 100% thought it was a good idea. However, only three thought they would use the service within the next year.

    So I have to ask this survey company, are you sure of your 57% figure? Would you base your survey companies financial future on these figures? If I asked 14 people and received 100% NO, how did you get your results? One must have an unbiased sample base to produce solid and credible results, and in this survey, it is clear here, they did not.

  3. Joe McCarthy

    Interesting topic, but the title and other representations of the data and results seem rather unsubstantiated.

    The 97% estimate of "usefulness" appears to be based on a presumption that everyone but the 3% of those surveyed who said mobile barcodes are "not very useful" find them useful … even though only 57% of those surveyed claimed to have even scanned a mobile barcode.

    There is considerable sample bias in Facebook and Twitter to begin with, and if the poll were conducted among friends and followers of ScanBuy, that would add further sample bias to the survey.

    1. Tony

      Dude, I wouldn't give much credibility to this article.

      Working on the 137% scale the writer is using, this makes perfect sense. These numbers seemed bogus from the start, notice how they said "the barcode provider" instead of naming the company. That could have been an oversight but then again, it could have been on purpose.

      Cannot fact check that.

Comments are closed.