mHealth Offerings Disappoint At CES

As I roamed the more than 1 million square feet of gadgets at this year’s Consumer Electronics Show (CES), I was disappointed with the lack of innovation on display in terms of mobile healthcare (mHealth) offerings. As I’ve said before, the future of mobile healthcare will be defined by the software that’s integrated with the …   Read More

1312 8
1312 8

As I roamed the more than 1 million square feet of gadgets at this year’s Consumer Electronics Show (CES), I was disappointed with the lack of innovation on display in terms of mobile healthcare (mHealth) offerings.

As I’ve said before, the future of mobile healthcare will be defined by the software that’s integrated with the devices we already carry with us everyday — our cell phones.  At CES, nearly all the offerings on display were hardware-related, and most had to do with basic health monitoring using bulky, cumbersome devices that consumers will likely resist to adopt.

As I see it, we already have the hardware available in terms of smartphones necessary to facilitate the innovation in healthcare that we’ve all been promised for a long time.  Creating software to run on these devices is the direction we need to go, not introducing brand new devices that consumers will be forced to wear or install in their homes to benefit from the new wave in digital healthcare.

Monitoring is a prime example.  There were numerous watch-like devices that consumers would have to wear, or bulky plug-in appliances that go in consumers’ homes on display at the show, and it just doesn’t make sense.  Why not create a smartphone application and possibly a small, unnoticeable sensor that integrates with the smartphone itself to do the same thing?

As the revolution in digital/mobile healthcare is poised to present one of the largest advances in technology that we’ve seen to date, the future is in the software, not the hardware.

In this article

8 comments

  1. RobertSanchezGTM

    Thanks for the article Justin! Although innovation in hardware in the mHealth wing of CES this year seemed to be below expectations, there is currently a huge opportunity for the future of mHealth in software that leverages the hardware that already exists. At my company, Globaltel Media, we have customized our SMS messaging platform for various healthcare implementations without the use of any additional hardware. While maintaining HIPAA compliance, our system can deliver everything from appointment logistics/scheduling to relaying rich media content like X-rays and CAT scans to physicians to simply conducting a local mobile marketing campaigns to boost patient traffic. As you've mentioned, mobile healthcare is set to grow and we look forward to seeing the benefits for both patients and doctors, creating the ideal win-win situation.

  2. mHealth Offerings Disappoint At CES | Mobile Marketing Watch | Mobile Marketing Online

    […] year’s Consumer Electronics Show (CES), I was disappointed with the lack of innovation on. mobile marketing – Google Blog Search This entry was posted in Sms Marketing and tagged Disappoint, Marketing, mHealth, Mobile, […]

  3. mHealth Offerings Disappoint At CES | Mobile Marketing Watch | Mobile Marketing Site

    […] year’s Consumer Electronics Show (CES), I was disappointed with the lack of innovation on. mobile marketing – Google Blog Search This entry was posted in Mobile Marketing and tagged Disappoint, Marketing, mHealth, Mobile, […]

  4. Rohan Aurora

    You certainly need to read this post from CES 2011 : Turning your iPhone into a Real-time Biomedical ECG Monitoring System : http://goo.gl/Ry0Tu

  5. Dr Dave Albert

    Justin, you are preaching to the choir and based on the enthusiastic response we have received regarding our iPhone ECG, people all over the world share your insights. Thanks. DrDaveAlbert @drdave01

  6. David Doherty

    Now that the US has a well attended (eg 2500+ delegates & 100 exhibitors) mHealth Summit (mHealthSummit.org) I can't see why a mHealth software company targeting patients, healthcare workers/providers would want to exhibit at a consumer electronics event?

    It also seems that getting audience/media attention at a massive event like CES requires marketing methods that are too risky for mHealth brands who also have to respect the reputations of any associated clinicians/patients.

    The iHealth Labs pitch would be a classic example of this. It's already got at least 5x the views of Dr Huynh's other videos, which include the rather similar Withing's BP monitoring device: http://www.vimeo.com/18651575

  7. @mediaburst

    Yep and as usual the focus (including your article) is on smartphones. But there is still a low level of penetration of smartphones, we need healthcare apps that can work on ALL phones. http://www.mediaburst.co.uk/blog/mobile-healthcar

  8. @harrisja

    Hey Justin – it's Jason Harris; could you send me an email? i don't have yours (after I left Taptu) and it'd be fun to reconnect.

    I wish I had known you were going to CES – I was there too. 🙂

Comments are closed.