Greystripe CEO: “Open or Not, Apple’s Flash Ban Creates Huge Issues For Advertisers”

On the heels of Steve Jobs publishing his harsh criticism of Adobe and its Flash technology in general this morning, Greystripe CEO Michael Chang issued a response firing back at Jobs saying “open or not, Apple’s Flash ban creates huge issues for advertisers.” The underlying message in Chang’s response is clear; nearly all ad creative …   Read More

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Greystripe CEO Open or Not, Apple’s Flash Ban Creates Huge Issues For AdvertisersOn the heels of Steve Jobs publishing his harsh criticism of Adobe and its Flash technology in general this morning, Greystripe CEO Michael Chang issued a response firing back at Jobs saying “open or not, Apple’s Flash ban creates huge issues for advertisers.”

The underlying message in Chang’s response is clear; nearly all ad creative is built using Flash, and Apple needs to face it.  “Apple’s choice not to support Flash on its mobile devices creates huge roadblocks for advertisers,” Chang said in his response.  “Today, it cannot be understated that almost 100% of agencies and their brand advertisers develop ad creatives in Flash using Adobe tools.”

He also criticizes Apple’s emphasis on HTML5, based on the fact that few development tools exist for creative purposes.  “Currently, there are no comparable tools to create ads in HTML5, open or not, he continued.  “This is partially an explanation as to why Apple/Quattro has opted to create the initial iAds, because no one else can, at least not in HTML5.”

Chang previously expressed his concerns with Apple’s “anti-Flash” mantra earlier this month when iAds was first announced, and has a pretty good reason for keeping a close eye on the Apple/Flash debacle.  Greystripe itself is known for its rich media “iFlash” ads which use transcoding methods to being a “Flash-like” experience to Apple’s Flash-less devices.

Chang concluded with a quote from Lars Bastholm, chief digital creative officer at Ogilvy, in his response today which seems to summarize the sentiment felt in many ad-agencies regarding Apple and Steve Jobs’ stance on Flash; “As a creative director, I can completely understand that they created this new baby and they want to make sure it gets born looking gorgeous. But as a creative director, I don’t feel completely comfortable letting Apple do the creative.”

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4 comments

  1. Mash

    I don’t know what you mean by keep his statements to the truth.. Did you read the articles he posted:
    http://www.apple.com/hotnews/thoughts-on-flash

    All his arguments are factual and sure make sense to me. Why people use flash anymore (apple or not) is beyond me..

  2. Justin Time

    Not sure where Apple is going with this… once all the other phones come out with Flash support, does Apple really think the rest of the world is going to remake all of their sites for the iPhone? It’s more likely that mobile devices will have to adapt to make use of web universe that is already exists out there.

  3. Gareth Pursehouse

    I wrote up quite a few comments about this subject as well. Steve can’t even keep his statement to the truth.

  4. Diesel Mcfadden

    What most people are missing is that while HTML5 on desktop is far from wide deployment, that’s not true on mobile. As everyone except for Microsoft (and they’re not shipping until christmas) is or will be running a Webkit-based browser (RIM, Google, Palm/HP, Apple) HTML5 on mobile will be a consistent environment with the latest HTML5 technologies.

    Apple’s statements really have to be seen through a lens where the desktop past doesn’t matter to them at all versus the mobile future.
    Advertisers will have to re-author anyway for mobile devices. The way to do that natively and consistently is with HTML5.

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