Facebook Now Releasing Spam Report Cards to App Developers

The forces behind Facebook are not only cracking down on the amount of spam that’s tainting the world’s most popular social networking platform, they’re also giving app developers a veritable spam report card to raise awareness about user feedback. For some time now, Facebook has been closely monitoring (via spam-fighting bots) and yanking any and …   Read More

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The forces behind Facebook are not only cracking down on the amount of spam that’s tainting the world’s most popular social networking platform, they’re also giving app developers a veritable spam report card to raise awareness about user feedback.

For some time now, Facebook has been closely monitoring (via spam-fighting bots) and yanking any and all apps that have received significantly negative user feedback.

But the overzealous bots eventually started penalizing much too harshly the developers who were largely left in the dark about why their updates were raising red flags, getting blocked, and causing all sorts of related problems.

Facebook is endeavoring to solve this issue by developing and launching a new feature

Today we’re launching improvements to our enforcement systems that will provide more user feedback directly to developers and will use that feedback to shape app distribution in a more granular way

“Today, we’re starting to rollout a ‘News Feed’ tab in Insights to show you both positive user feedback (e.g., comments, likes, clicks) and negative user feedback (e.g., hides, marks as spam) on your content,” says Facebook engineer Mike Vernal. “The red and green areas of these graphs will provide guidance on whether your app is generally in good standing or whether your app is receiving a significant amount of negative feedback. We will be adding more granular Insights for other channels in the coming months.”

In addition to the new spam report cards, Facebook is revamping its monitoring and enforcement procedures to better serve the purposes they’re intended to serve.

In the coming months, we will be moving from per-channel enforcements to a more sophisticated ranking model where the amount of distribution that content gets will be a direct function of its quality. Good content will be seen by more people, poor content will be seen by fewer people (and potentially no one). We think this is the right long-term model, as it rewards apps that focus on great social experiences while minimizing negative experiences.

To read the full announcement from Facebook, click here.

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