Dunkin’ Donuts: Using Mobile to Look Through the Windshield, Not the Rearview Mirror

When it comes to marketing, Dunkin’ Donuts believes that it’s a balance of mobile and traditional marketing that will best project its brand personality. That was the take offered by Caitlyn Bohannon in a recent piece for Mobile Commerce Daily. “The Dunkin’ executive’s “Is Mobile the First and Ultimate Storytelling Screen?” session looked at how …   Read More

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Dunkin’ Donuts Using Mobile to Look Through the Windshield, Not the Rearview MirrorWhen it comes to marketing, Dunkin’ Donuts believes that it’s a balance of mobile and traditional marketing that will best project its brand personality.

That was the take offered by Caitlyn Bohannon in a recent piece for Mobile Commerce Daily.

“The Dunkin’ executive’s “Is Mobile the First and Ultimate Storytelling Screen?” session looked at how the brand’s reliance on partners, such as its 16-year relationship with advertising company Hill Holliday, have helped it implement a mobile-centric approach that engages fans and followers in ongoing dialogues,” notes Bohannon. “Dunkin’s efforts reflect a desire to move the brand forward toward mobile while remaining true to its core values.”

John Costello, president of global marketing and innovation for the company, thinks firms need to understand their own missions.

“Understand the core of who your brand is,” Costello said during the presentation. “It’s very easy, particularly with the speed of mobile, to get caught up in the excitement of the technology and walk away from who you are.”

How did the company start its mobile journey?

“Dunkin’ Donuts had to first adapt to mobile by engaging with its customers where they are. By remaining authentic to its brand, Dunkin’ attempted mobile in a way to differentiate itself from its competitors,” says Bohannon. “The brand also thought on a long-term basis. It knew investing in mobile innovations should not be approached with short-term goals.”

Interestingly, Costello reminds companies they should be focusing on the donut, and not the hole.

“It’s not about the technology,” Mr. Costello said. “It’s really about asking yourself, ‘Who is your brand?’”

And that’s not all.

“We’re under pressure [as marketers] to generate weekly, monthly and quarterly results,” he said. “What we’ve found at Dunkin’ is that we really need to look through the windshield instead of the rear-view mirror.”

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