Don’t Place Your Bets on Google Glass in Casinos

It’s a safe bet that by next year at this time, you’re going to see Google Glass just about everywhere… everywhere, that is, but inside of any casino that knows what’s best for business. The augmented reality wearable computer with a head-mounted display is expected to be released by the end of 2013. And you …   Read More

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It’s a safe bet that by next year at this time, you’re going to see Google Glass just about everywhere… everywhere, that is, but inside of any casino that knows what’s best for business.

The augmented reality wearable computer with a head-mounted display is expected to be released by the end of 2013. And you can count on it being a hot commodity. But since Google Glass may also be capable of counting cards, don’t expect to roam freely around Las Vegas wearing it, say tech security experts who believe criminals and other devious minds may look for ways to capitalize on the technology for underhanded deeds.

Privacy is another concern, as illustrated in Seattle this week at the 5 Point Cafe. The establishment, according to a report from Geekwire, is one of the first in the nation to declare a ban on Google Glass. The reason?

The eatery’s owner wishes to prevent the risk of her patrons being recorded by the futuristic glasses.

Google’s high-tech augmented reality “Project Glass” spectacles are still in development and not available for purchase by the general public. But the bar’s pre-emptive ban, announced on its Facebook page this past week, has been getting national attention, and fueling a debate over privacy.

If we’re already hearing about Google Glass bans months before the product arrives, is it fair to assume that a large number of local and national businesses – if not entire industries – will prevent Google Glass from being used on their property? What about places of employment?

No one, naturally, is suggesting that technology’s evolution and advancement should be put on hold due to the uncertainty that looms over such a revolutionary product release. But there will be myriad concerns and questions. And there’s a good chance that privacy and security concerns could initially inhibit the adoption of Google Glass.

Do you expect resistance to the technology upon release, or will Google Glass be the must-have “next big thing” right from the start?

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