Bell+CTV=Mobile Video Explosion, Eh

Bell Canada Enterprises is buying television and radio giant CTV, the phone communications company has announced–and that could mean major mobile video growth in the Great White North. BCE is the parent of telecom Bell Canada; the company sells landline, digital TV, and Internet services in addition to wireless. It’s already had time to play …   Read More

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Bell Canada Enterprises is buying television and radio giant CTV, the phone communications company has announced–and that could mean major mobile video growth in the Great White North.

BCE is the parent of telecom Bell Canada; the company sells landline, digital TV, and Internet services in addition to wireless. It’s already had time to play with the new paradigm of video distribution–basically, at the consumer’s convenience via Internet on their computers or phones. But Bell Canada’s pairing with the enormous library of CTV’s content–including rights to the 2012 Olympics–means this: The country that once lagged as much as the United States in terms of mobile technology could see unprecedented growth in the quantity and quality of videos distributed on smart phones.

BCE hinted as much when announcing the acquisition.

George Cope, President and CEO of Bell Canada and BCE, said in a news release that the purchase is in line with “accelerating Bell’s video growth across all three screens–mobile, online and TV” and will “maximize…the efficiency of our content and advertising spend.” The release also said, “Video is growing rapidly in popularity among Canadians, who are increasingly moving to mobile, online and digital TV platforms for video content. Bell already offers… the most advanced mobile TV products.”

Reluctant content owners who don’t want their videos broadcast on mobile will soon have no choice, if they want to remain competitive. As we noted earlier here and here, video sharing sites are becoming compatible with all smart and multimedia phones, while premium cable network¬†HBO plans some kind of mobile distribution.

With a major telecom and a content behemoth joining forces, and the corporation about to call all the shots has shown commitment to mobile distribution, similar companies in other countries–particularly the nearby United States–will have to follow suit if they want to meet consumers’ evolved demands.

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