AT&T Growing Cell Network by Going to Church

Lord… can you hear me now? It seems AT&T is going to church for the purpose of expanding its cellular network although we’ve haven’t confirmed yet that prayer is actually involved in the effort. As it turns out, AT&T has been bolstering its network with the addition of new and cleverly hidden cell towers, some …   Read More

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Lord… can you hear me now?

It seems AT&T is going to church for the purpose of expanding its cellular network although we’ve haven’t confirmed yet that prayer is actually involved in the effort.

As it turns out, AT&T has been bolstering its network with the addition of new and cleverly hidden cell towers, some of which are being placed inside churches – locations that are apparently well suited for the cause.

In Baltimore, Maryland, as just one example, AT&T has apparently placed a stealth tower within the church steeple of Holy Cross Catholic church. Most parishioners, incredibly, are unaware of the cell tower’s placement as it is largely invisible to the causal observer.

According to CBS News in Baltimore:

AT&T was anxious to expand its coverage in Baltimore City, but knew erecting a traditional cell phone tower in Federal Hill wouldn’t work. So as part of the company’s $19 billion nationwide investment in wireless networks, its wires now weave through the church and all the way up the steeple, but out of sight of parishioners.

“Parishes struggle financially and AT&T has been very cooperative and collaborative in helping us preserve our church, keep it open without disturbing any of the architectural structure or the sacredness of it,” says Father Patrick Carrion of Holy Cross Church.

AT&T compensates the church in an ongoing fashion in the form of a lease payment to house the tower.

The number of agreements AT&T has with churches is growing, as the carrier also recently announced the placement of a stealth cell tower at The Cathedral of Mary Our Queen – another church located in the city of Baltimore.

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1 comment

  1. Edw

    Seriously? They have been doing this since the 1990's. This isn't anything new.
    See this AP article from 1996: http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=a6kaAAAAIBAJ

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