Apple to Release Siri-Powered HDTV Says New York Times

The New York Times is reporting that Apple will release a Siri-powered HDTV by 2013. Sources close to Apple confirm that the TV will represent the next major product category Apple is poised to tackle. “It’s the stuff of science fiction,” writes Nick Bilton of The New York Times. “You sit on your couch and …   Read More

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The New York Times is reporting that Apple will release a Siri-powered HDTV by 2013.

Sources close to Apple confirm that the TV will represent the next major product category Apple is poised to tackle.

“It’s the stuff of science fiction,” writes Nick Bilton of The New York Times. “You sit on your couch and rather than fumble with several remotes or use hand gestures, you simply talk: ‘Put on the last episode of Gossip Girl.’ ‘Play the local news headlines.’ ‘Play some Coldplay music videos.’ Siri does the rest.”

Earlier this month we learned that late Apple CEO Steve Jobs told his biographer Walter Isaacson that he had finally “cracked” the secret to building the ultimate connected-HDTV. As a result, Apple’s rumored Siri-Powered HDTV will deliver “the simplest user interface you could imagine.”

Of course this experience goes beyond just playing TV shows or the local news. As the line between television programming and Web content continues to erode, a Siri-powered television would become more necessary. You aren’t going to want to flip through file folders or baskets of content, checking off what you want. Telling Siri to “play videos of cute cats falling asleep” would return an endless YouTube stream of adorable napping fur balls.

The New York Times‘ report suggests that Apple has been working on this product since 2007. The primary hold-up onTV’s market debut is that components are still so expensive that the HDTV would come with an uncompetitive price tag in today’s market.

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3 comments

  1. Raphael Richard

    @Susan Bizzibiz: people will not buy because it is an apple TV, but because it will be a toy, an object of desire. TV manufacturers succeeded in convincing consumers to change old TV set against flat ones will no other added value than the design (the quality of the picture of flat screen being far BELOW previous cathodic TVs). But, Apple convinced telephone subscribers to swift to smartphones because of the new services they could get.

    Imagine that you will be able to tell your TV to lower the sound, to find the channel that deals with your passion (kite surf ? global warming ? French gastronomy ?) among the 10 000 TV channels that will be available , to find an ecommerce channel dedicated to a niche (let's say extreme food, for example), to connect you through a dating video TV-site, to find the latest cityville cheat, to find an expert of scrapbooking, to find a video broadcast of the the party in the hotest NYC club or in the small club in your town, to let you show your baby's first steps to your lonely grand mother in her retirement home 500km away.

    That is why you could want to buy an internet TV !

    If it is rightly priced (and we may imagine that Apple may revolutionize not only tradtionnal TV manufacturers business models, but also that of TV channels themselves. The impact of the apple TV on economy and usages may go beyond that of smartphones.

    Google's Eric Schmidt said in january 2008, that smarphones will seduce the second billion of internet users by 2014 after the first one came through desktops and laptops. He named it as the "funny" internet. I bet that Smart TVs (or connected TVs, or whatever word we will then used) will seduce two additionnal billons internet users by 2020.

  2. smart [poster

    I read a great article on Street Fight today that outlined how Siri could become a big player in the daily deals marketplace

  3. Susan BizziBiz

    It will be interesting to see how people take to this. I wonder if people will buy the TV just because it is made by Apple or if because it actually make a great sound and picture.

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