Allure Sees 444,572 Mobile Barcode Scans Using Microsoft Tags, Largest Campaign Ever

Back in April, we covered a mobile barcode campaign sponsored by Sports Illustrated that used JagTag’s technology to turn its annual Swimsuit Edition into an interactive experience.  At the time, the campaign represented the most successful and largest deployment of mobile barcodes to date in the US — achieving over 100,000 scans. A new campaign …   Read More

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Back in April, we covered a mobile barcode campaign sponsored by Sports Illustrated that used JagTag’s technology to turn its annual Swimsuit Edition into an interactive experience.  At the time, the campaign represented the most successful and largest deployment of mobile barcodes to date in the US — achieving over 100,000 scans.

A new campaign by Allure magazine achieved nearly four times the response using Microsoft’s proprietary mobile barcode technology to secure nearly 450,000 scans.  The campaign, which allowed readers to enter a number of free giveaways, is now the largest mobile barcode campaign to date.  Allure teamed with Microsoft to embed 39 mobile barcodes in its August issue, promoting 159 separate giveaways of beauty products worth $725,000.

When a user scanned any one of the barcodes, they received a text-message reminder 15 minutes before the giveaways on a certain page.  In addition, A “master” Microsoft Tag in the back of the magazine and on its Website could be scanned for a chance to win any or all of the giveaways.  Allure said it saw a 38 percent increase in the number of participants due to the barcodes, and said users were 2.5-times as active as PC users.

The campaign represented the largest consumer deployment of Microsoft Tags to date, which provided a much needed boost to the company’s proprietary technology that many have deemed useless as so many open barcode technologies exist.  “Allure magazine and Microsoft Tag are collaborating together to take mobile marketing to a whole new level,” said Anna Kim-Williams, senior global media strategist of the Startup Business Group at Microsoft.  “The strategy behind the Microsoft Tags was to make the magazine mobile for Allure readers and more specifically, to extend the annual August giveaway to mobile users.

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11 comments

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  6. john

    tag really rocks …i am not surprised at all…reader works great on my iphone …wonder if they will have it for phone 7 ? anyone ?

  7. Guest

    OK, here's an odd thought:

    Microsoft Tag are the iPhone of the 2D/QR universe. Proprietary, closed. A lot of happy customers.

    QR Tags are the Android of the 2D/QR universe. Open sourced, coupled with fragmentation, including new layers added atop the core that can confuse the UX, etc.

    Google are now testing the waters in this same space with "Goggles" (ran their first ad the other day with it). Goggles, that runs on Android and iPhone devices could be, what's their equivalent? Are they serious about competing here? Or, will all Goggle scans resolve to "search" pages?

    Then, you get the platforms that seem lost in the fray already, the Symbian's of the 2D/QR World (the readerless systems that can't get you to a mobile web page, etc.).

    Android are including Goggles on their phones. Presumably, Microsoft/Mobile will include Microsoft Tag Reader on their system. QR Readers will be bandied about, but, it is an old technology at this point.

    I'm surprised by Microsoft Tag's success, but, they've earned it. Right now, yes, they are the iPhone of the 2D/QR World. I hope they continue to succeed while everyone else wallows.

    1. JustinMMW

      Good point – closed can sometimes mean a well-oiled machine with many happy customers (i.e. Apple), but Microsoft has been in that position before and not capitalized on it.

      Including it on new Windows Phones will help its cause as well,-that kind of distribution and marketing is something third parties can't compete with. Let's hope this campaign represents an aggressive push by Microsoft in this arena…

  8. My2Cents

    Those "other" bar codes had been around for a long time but never got much traction as well they had many negative aspects making them not to desireable.

  9. JustinMMW

    What I meant is that ever since Microsoft debuted its "tag" barcoding solution, many have questioned its relevance when there's numerous other "open" standards like 2D, QR and others that are widely available and redeemable. With Microsoft introducing its own solution, in addition to the need for proprietary readers to scan the barcodes, it fragments the already limited use of mobile barcodes in general in the US.

    This campaign, as I noted, is a boon to Microsoft and its technology, so I could be wrong on my assumptions. What are your thoughts on the subject?

  10. Dave

    That's good journalism – "technology that many have deemed useless"? According to what source???

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