Adobe Studies Ad Engagement in Digital Magazines

On Monday, Adobe published the results of a new survey indicating that advertisements in digital magazines – those which are available on e-readers and tablets like the iPad – “more effectively engage readers and create stronger purchase intention” than comparable ads offered in print. Writing on the Adobe Digital Publishing blog, author Dave Dickson noted …   Read More

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On Monday, Adobe published the results of a new survey indicating that advertisements in digital magazines – those which are available on e-readers and tablets like the iPad – “more effectively engage readers and create stronger purchase intention” than comparable ads offered in print.

Writing on the Adobe Digital Publishing blog, author Dave Dickson noted that the research yielded a paper entitled “Digital Ad Engagement: Perceived Interactivity as a Driver of Advertising Effectiveness.” The research was conducted by Alex Wang, Ph.D. at the University of Connecticut.

The study focused on readers between the ages of 18 and 32. The test required each participant to review both print and iPad versions of various ads. The subjects then ranked their perceived interactivity, engagement, message involvement, attitude toward the adds, and purchase intent.

Once the results were compared, the research discovered that readers are more likely to engage with interactive than static ads, as well as have a more favorable attitude to the ad and greater purchase intent.

“The result is a new brand advertising paradigm where advertisers can engage customers with a brand in the immersive context of a digital magazine — in contrast to the interruptive, templatized, and commoditized nature of current digital display ad inventory,” Dickson wrote.

“The study also found clear statistical connections among the five measured categories in the experiment,” Dickson added. “By using interactivity such as motion graphics, sound, slideshows and animation, advertisers can engage readers and create favorable attitudes toward their brands.

To read the full report from Adobe, click here.

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