Infographic: Is Texting Making Our Grammar More Bad?

Analogous to how spell check and autocorrect software have purportedly created a tech dependency that hampers our literacy, a new study shows that texting is having similarly nefarious …

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Analogous to how spell check and autocorrect software have purportedly created a tech dependency that hampers our literacy, a new study shows that texting is having similarly nefarious consequences for our grammar.

Outlined in a somewhat disturbing new infographic, research conducted by OnlineCollege.org shows that texting is seriously impairing our ability to communicate in a way that would make the Queen proud.

According to the data presented, texting during middle school years – a formative period in a young person’s education, particularly with regard to writing skills – is on the rise. And the survey results indicate some troubling patterns associated with this reality.

50% of surveyed teens, for example, admit to not using proper punctuation or grammatical marks when composing texts.

Incredibly, 11% of those surveyed even believe that electronic communications are negatively impacting their writing skills.

For more insights from the fascinating new study, check out the infographic below.

Do you believe texting has had a counterproductive influence on grammar and written communication?

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3 comments

  1.    Reply

    If you think of texting as an offshoot of telephoning, then tech-speak is a substitute for speech and will be filled with all the shortcuts, contractions and slang that we use when we are speaking. However, what many people forget is that e-mail is a substitute for snail-mail – real old-fashioned letters – and should be treated as such, with proper grammar, salutations, spelling, etc, especially in a professional setting. Kids are pretty flexible and will learn whatever we teach them. Remind them that sophisticated ideas can only be expressed using sophisticated language.

  2.    Reply

    You actually need quite a sophisticated grasp of the English language to be able to communicate in "TechSpeak". However, students become quite irate when required to use correct, formal English grammar conventions in a classroom or examination situation. They fail to see the value in practicing these conventions, when they only want to get their IDEAS across. We teaching staff are fighting a losing battle!

  3.    Reply

    Without a doubt texting and outlets with fixed character limits are ruining grammar. But it's not just in teenagers and children. I see plenty of adults and professionals who have completely disregarded grammar in emails and correspondence. It's deeply concerning.