Aggressive Mobile Marketing Still Doesn’t Work

Mobile marketing simply doesn’t work if you’re too aggressive. That’s the repeated argument made by no shortage of executives in the mobile marketing and advertising space today, the …

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Mobile marketing simply doesn’t work if you’re too aggressive. That’s the repeated argument made by no shortage of executives in the mobile marketing and advertising space today, the latest of whom is David Safai, CEO of Mobixa.

“Mobixa LLC is a small company that began in mid 2012 from our parent company, IMC, which has been around for over 15 years,” Safai reveals in a new interview.

“Originally I wanted to be aggressive with our marketing and play these Internet ads three times a week,” he tells The LA Marketing Examiner. “However, our team advised us that we don’t want to overwhelm the consumer and eventually they’ll get to the point of hearing from them. The advice was the exact opposite of what I was expecting to hear, but I learned that if you just educate people, in time they’ll come to you.”

Safai is among the growing number of players in the industry to find that overwhelming consumers isn’t necessarily a smart mobile marketing move – yet its a move that has hindered countless firms that haven’t discovered how this approach can backfire again and again.

With the mobile marketing/advertising industry still in its infancy relative to where it could be in the next decade, the self-regulating nature of the business has led to no shortage of abuses and overstepped-boundaries.

But, with time, it appears that the general failures of aggressive mobile marketing campaigns will do more than anything else to curb their existence.

As a mobile consumer, do you feel that mobile marketing has become more or less aggressive in 2012? Please weigh in with a thought or comment below.

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3 comments

  1.    Reply

    I agree with the first comment. It's really easy to get carried away with the frequency of your text marketing messages but you must always think…"how would I react to this many texts".

    It's incredibly effective but can also be detrimental to your business if you abuse it.

  2.    Reply

    I agree with the need to tone it down even if you have a permission based list. So far I've seen best results with such campaigns when a customer is asked how often do you want to be sent offers. First a survey can be sent to all and depending on the responses they need to be grouped as per their request. I found an app for business may be a better choice as in this case you all who uploaded your app are happy to receive a push notification from you. Read details on http://www.localbusinessqr.com

  3.    Reply

    I'm on the SMS Marketing side of Mobile Marketing and I can say without a doubt that SMS Marketing gets too aggressive, too often. And there are dozens of SMS spam lawsuits to prove it. The trick, in my opinion, is to avoid two common pitfalls. The first is, don't spam people. Just don't do it. The best SMS platforms are strictly opt-in and don't allow list uploads anyway, so if you have the right platform you're already headed in the right direction. The second is a bit trickier and that is, be human. SMS Marketing is a powerful tool for small retail businesses, for example, because it allows owners to convey that same high-touch, personal feeling that customers get by shopping a boutique store. Don't bombard people with hastily written, poorly thought out texts. Instead send them something of value that reminds them of your in-store experience. If you're interested, here's a blog post about this very subject. wp.me/p2PToP-7I